Anglais - Ma phrase est-elle correcte ?

bonjour ! j'ai un exercice a faire dans lequel je dois modifier des phrases en utilisant un auxiliaire modal
j'ai la phrase : it is possible that his trip was cancelled at the last minute
est-ce correct de dire
His trip may have been cancelled at the last minute ?
thank you =D
«1

Réponses

  • Bonjour-
    Je suis bilingue en anglais et français, et je peux t'assurer que ta phrase est correcte, et a la meme signification que la phrase de depart. Cependant, je ne sais pas ce que c'est qu'un "auxiliaire modal" donc je peux pas te dire si c'est conforme aux consignes :S
  • JehanJehan Modérateur
    Il me semble que "may" est bien ce qu'on appelle un auxiliaire modal.
  • Jehan a écrit:
    Il me semble que "may" est bien ce qu'on appelle un auxiliaire modal.
    En effet, may est un modal, comme must ou might. :)
  • Petite précision : might est une autre forme de may. Effectivement c'est un auxiliaire modal comme can, must, should, need etc.
  • Bonsoir,
    J'ai vu cette phrase dans une série et je voulais savoir si elle était grammaticalement correcte :

    "I leave it to you to make the decision whether to trust me or not."

    Et si oui est-il correct de réutiliser la structure en disant :

    "They leave it to the customers to make the decision whether to tell the truth or not."

    Merci d'avance !
  • lamaneurlamaneur Modérateur
    Comme quoi les séries ont leur utilité ! ;)
    C'est parfait.
  • Super merci :D !
  • Si je peux encore...

    Je ne pense pas qu'elle est parfaitement correcte. Ceci dépend du contexte.

    Si c'est une décision du moment, ce serait 'I'll (will) leave it to you...'. Si ce n'est pas une décision du moment (ce qui n'est pas vraiment vraisemblable, car le speaker parle à quelqu'un et la seconde example ce tourne vers les clients en général), ce serait vraiment 'I leave it...', parce que, comme en français, l'anglais emploit l'indicatif présent à exprimer des vérités générales. Le contexte de la seconde phrase est un peu plus favorable pour l'indicatif.

    Le problème est que le "'ll" est difficile à entendre quand elle est parlée.
  • Bonjour

    La « Grammaire fondamentale de l’anglais » de Christian Loriaux et Jean-Louis Cupers explique que « can », auxiliaire modal de capacité, ne peut se mettre au futur, et doit alors être remplacé par « to be able to » ou « to manage to ». Elle explique aussi que, lorsque « can » exprime une permission ou une interdiction, il peut exprimer un futur ; exactement, elle dit qu’alors « on garde parfois les formes du présent si le futur n’est pas trop éloigné ou si le caractère futur n’est pas spécialement mis en évidence ».

    Maintenant, voici quelques citations qui me posent problème :

    When you fellows are in court for piracy, I’ll save you all I can (Treasure Island, chapter 28)

    I will sing you that song now, comrades. I am old and my voice is hoarse, but when I have taught you the tune, you can sing it better for yourselves (Animal Farm, chapter 1)

    “Bring it in here when you get it,” Grandpa Joe said. “Then we can all watch you taking off the wrapper” (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, chapter 6)

    A girl should think about making herself look attractive so she can get a good husband later on (Matilda, chapter 9)

    Accessoirement, en voici deux autres:

    “When ! By the powers !” cried Silver. “Well now, if you want to know, I’ll tell you when. The last moment I can manage, and that’s when. Here’s a first-rate seaman, Cap’n Smollett, sails the blessed ship for us” (Treasure Island, chapter 11)

    Look here, if you and all your people will come back to my country and live in my factory, you can have all the cacao beans you want! I’ve got mountains of them in my storehouses! You can have cacao beans for every meal! You can gorge yourselves silly on them! I’ll even pay your wages in cacao beans if you wish! (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, chapter 16).

    Mes questions sont les suivantes:
    1) pourquoi « can » au lieu de « shall (will) be able to » dans les citations 1 à 4.
    2) Le « can » au lieu de « shall be able to » dans la cinquième citation serait-il dû au fait que « the last moment » introduirait une subordonnée temporelle ?
    3) Le « can », dans la sixième citation, doit-il être interprété comme exprimant une permission ?

    Merci d’avance de vos éclaircissements.

    Cordialement et respectueusement.
  • Bonjour Michel,

    1)
    dans la citation 2, 3 et 4,
    On peut techniquement mettre les deux.
    Mais le «can» est plus fort, ça signifie possibilité sûre. il permet de mieux faire passer le message que will be able to., qui lui serait plutôt une «request», une possibilité moins sûre......

    2) On met can dans cette phrase à cause de «the last moment». Après, je ne sais pas si ça induit une subordonnée temporelle....
    3) Oui, le can de la 6e citation doit être interprété comme exprimant une permission.

    J'espère avoir répondu à tes questions, même si ma réponse pour la 1) reste un peu vague... mais j'espère que tu comprendras,
    Cordialement
  • Bonjour.

    Je remercie d’abord Espaname pour sa réponse. Ne peut-on résumer en disant que “can” exprime une capacité future regardée comme quasi-certaine par l’énonciateur, tandis que l’implication de celui-ci est beaucoup moins nette avec “will [shall] be able to” ? Il y aurait probablement la même nuance entre “can”, exprimant l'autorisation d’une action future et “will [shall] be allowed to”.

    Maintenant, je vais parler de l’auxiliaire modal “must”, qui pose de sérieux problèmes.

    Voici ce qu’écrit “The Chicago Manual of Style” dans la section 147 de son “Grammar and Usage” :
    “MUST denotes a necessity that arises from someone’s will [we must obey the rules] or from circumstances [you must ask what the next step is] [he went to New York because he must]. Must also connotes a logical conclusion [that must be the right answer] [that must be the house we’re looking for] [it must have been Donna who phoned]. THIS VERB DOES NOT VARY ITS FORM IN EITHER THE PRESENT OR PAST INDICATIVE. It does not have an infinitive form (to have to is substituted) or a present or past participle. Denoting obligation, necessity, or inference, must is always used with an express or implied infinitive [we must finish this design] [everyone must eat] [the movie must be over by now].”

    Sur internet, on lit aussi ceci:
    “It's pretty futile to tell learners that MUST should be changed to HAD TO in all past contexts. Like Mr. James Yeh, who asked the original question, learners will find MUST used frequently in past contexts. It's more realistic to advise them to use HAD TO in past tense independent clauses, and to use MUST in dependent clauses (usually noun or adjective clauses) when the sense is that of strong obligation or strong probability. ”

    Cependant, il me semble que “must” apparaît parfois dans des propositions PRINCIPALES avec le sens de « devait » ou « devrait ». En voici des exemples :

    His stories were what frightened people worst of all […]. By his own account he must have lived his life among some of the wickedest men that God ever allowed upon the sea. (Treasure Island, chapter 1)

    Something must speedily be resolved upon, and it occurred to us at last to go forth together and seek help in the neighbouring hamlet. (Treasure Island, chapter4)

    It was only in the exact bottom of the dell and round the tavern door that a thin veil still hung unbroken to conceal the first steps of our escape. Far less than half-way to the hamlet, very little beyond the bottom of the hill, we must come forth into the moonlight. Nor was this all, for the sound of several footsteps running came already to our ears. (Treasure Island, chapter 4)

    He was concealed by this time behind another tree trunk; but he must have been watching me closely, for as soon as I began to move in his direction he reappeared and took a step to meet me. (Treasure Island, chapter 15)

    Had it been otherwise, I must long ago have perished; but as it was, it is surprising how easily and securely my little and light boat could ride. (Treasure Island, chapter 24)

    By and by the judge rose and moved away on some obscure mission and after a while someone asked the expriest if it were true that at one time there had been two moons in the sky and the expriest eyed the false moon above them and said that it may well have been so. But certainly the wise high God in his dismay at the proliferation of lunacy on this earth must have wetted a thumb and leaned down out of the abyss and pinched it hissing into extinction. And could he find some alter means by which the birds could mend their paths in the darkness he might have done with this one too. (Blood Meridian, chapter 17)

    The doctor's torso was dragged up by the heels and raised and flung onto the pyre and the doctor's mastiff also was committed to the flames. It slid struggling down the far side and the thongs with which it was tied must have burnt in two for it began to crawl charred and blind and smoking from the fire and was flung back with a shovel. (Blood Meridian, chapter 19)

    He must have seen her before because he didn’t show any sign of surprise at all when she was introduced to him. (Jean-Claude Souesme, Grammaire anglaise en contexte)

    Etc., etc.

    En somme, tout se passe comme si, dans un récit au passé, “must” prenait le sens de « devait » ou « devrait », même quand il n’est pas précédé d’un verbe introducteur au passé.

    Mais alors, que signifient des phrases comme les suivantes :

    1) Only tractors, wagons, and trucks used this entrance, and over the many years, they had cut just as many ruts across the yard. I must have hit every one of them, driving up to the house. (A lesson before dying, chapter 3)

    2) Somewhere across the field I could hear the sound of a tractor. A white sharecropper must have been plowing the ground, since no colored people were working today. (A lesson before dying, chapter 32)

    3) Glanton wandered through the tall and dusty rooms with their ceilings and at length he found an old criada cowering in what must have passed for a kitchen although it contained nothing culinary save a brazier and a few clay pots. (Blood Meridian, chapter 14)

    Dans la première de ces trois citations, doit-on traduire par « j’avais dû heurter » ou par « j’ai dû heurter » ? Dans la deuxième, doit-on traduire par « un métayer blanc avait dû labourer » ou par « un métayer blanc devait labourer » ? Enfin, dans la troisième, doit-on comprendre « avait dû passer » ou « devait passer » ?

    Merci d’avance de votre réponse. Cordialement et respectueusement.
  • Bonjour Michel,

    désolée de ma réponse un peu tardive...

    «Ne peut-on résumer en disant que “can” exprime une capacité future regardée comme quasi-certaine par l’énonciateur, tandis que l’implication de celui-ci est beaucoup moins nette avec “will [shall] be able to” ? Il y aurait probablement la même nuance entre “can”, exprimant l'autorisation d’une action future et “will [shall] be allowed to”.»
    Oui, on peut résumer en disant cela..En fait c'est ça!

    Cependant, il me semble que “must” apparaît parfois dans des propositions PRINCIPALES avec le sens de « devait » ou « devrait ».Oui, elle apparaît parfois comme ça...

    Dans la plupart de tes exemples, on utilise le must pour exprimer quelque chose dont on est certain. De ce fait, on utilise alors doit, ou devait (parce que devrait,est un conditionnel présent et n'exprime pas une certitude...)


    1) Only tractors, wagons, and trucks used this entrance, and over the many years, they had cut just as many ruts across the yard. I must have hit every one of them, driving up to the house. (A lesson before dying, chapter 3)

    Dans cette phrase, le «I» est sûr (à 99,9 %) qu'il les a tous heurtés.
    Pour la traduction; je dirais:
    «Je dois avoir heurté», mais on peut utiliser j'avais du heurter (cependant, ça signifie qu'on est moins sur qu'il les a tous heurtés.)

    2) Somewhere across the field I could hear the sound of a tractor. A white sharecropper must have been plowing the ground, since no colored people were working today. (A lesson before dying, chapter 32)

    Dans cette phrase, on fait un déduction (since no colored people were working today, --> a white sharecropper must have been plowing the ground). On est donc pas sur que le sharecropper l'a labouré, et on est sûr qu'en lisant le reste de la phrase. Je dirais donc «Un métayer blanch avait dû labourer.

    3) Glanton wandered through the tall and dusty rooms with their ceilings and at length he found an old criada cowering in what must have passed for a kitchen although it contained nothing culinary save a brazier and a few clay pots. (Blood Meridian, chapter 14)

    Encore là, je mettrai avait dû passer, pour sensiblement les mêmes raisons qu'à la phrase 2.

    Voilà... Cordialement,
    espaname :)
  • Bonsoir Espaname

    Et merci pour votre réponse.

    Reprenons la phrase “Somewhere across the field I could hear the sound of a tractor. A white sharecropper must have been plowing the ground, since no colored people were working today.” Elle diffère de « A white sharecropper must be plowing the ground », et vous suggérez que « avait dû labourer » (ou « devait avoir labouré ») serait une hypothèse moins assurée, dans l’esprit de l’énonciateur, que « devait labourer ».

    Je me demande s’il n’y aurait pas une autre explication. Elle serait que le labour s’étend dans le passé jusqu’au moment où l’énonciateur (Grant Wiggins) l’entend, et que ceci justifierait le past perfect « have been plowing » au lieu du « be plowing ».

    De même, je traduirais la phrase « Only tractors, wagons, and trucks used this entrance, and over the many years, they had cut just as many ruts across the yard. I must have hit every one of them, driving up to the house” par “je dus avoir heurté chacune d’elles en approchant de la maison”.

    En effet, les autres citations que j’ai données semblent bien montrer que, dans un contexte passé, “must” a toujours le sens passé de “devait” ou “dut”. Dans un contexte passé, donner à « must » le sens de « doit » introduirait, me semble-t-il, « un brutal changement du moment de référence ».

    J’espère n’avoir pas dit trop de sottises, et j’attends votre avis avec un grand intérêt.

    Cordialement et respectueusement.
  • Bonjour

    Reprenons la phrase “Somewhere across the field I could hear the sound of a tractor. A white sharecropper must have been plowing the ground, since no colored people were working today.”

    -->Oui, elle diffère de « A white sharecropper must be plowing the ground. Cette dernière phrase, je la comprends comme A white sharecropper doit être en train de labourer (maintenant, enfin dans le présent) le sol.

    «Je me demande s’il n’y aurait pas une autre explication. Elle serait que le labour s’étend dans le passé jusqu’au moment où l’énonciateur (Grant Wiggins) l’entend.»

    -->Tandis que l'autre, comme tu l'as remarqué (très bonne explication d'ailleurs à laquelle je n'avais pas du tout pensée!) c'est du passé qui s'étend jusqu'au moment où l'énonciateur écrit (mais est-ce que ce passé est terminé au moment où l'énonciateur écrit??)


    De même, je traduirais la phrase « Only tractors, wagons, and trucks used this entrance, and over the many years, they had cut just as many ruts across the yard. I must have hit every one of them, driving up to the house” par “je dus avoir heurté chacune d’elles en approchant de la maison”.

    -->Je trouve cette traduction un peu lourde, d'autant plus qu'en français, on dit rarement (quasiment pas) cette tournure de phrase.... Je n'ai pas lu le livre, mais je crois que le narrateur fait une description, puis après il donne son avis (après recul, en utilisant le «I») des années après . Donc, je crois que mettre «dois» c'est mieux, mais je crois aussi qu'on peut mettre les deux.

    En espérant que tout ce que je dis ait un sens.... :)
    espaname
  • Bonjour Espaname

    Dans un récit au passé, il y a deux interprétations possibles de « must ».

    1) la première est que « must » a le sens de « devait » ou « dut » (ou « devrait ») ;
    2) la seconde est que le narrateur juge rétrospectivement, dans le temps où il écrit, donc au présent, des événements passés, et, dans ce cas, « must » aurait le sens de « doit ».

    La seconde interprétation suppose que le narrateur change brusquement de perspective. On trouve le même phénomène en français. En voici un exemple :
    « Puis leur convenait-il d’accepter mes propositions ? Laisseront-elles une sœur sans asile et sans fortune ? Jouiront-elles de son bien ? Que dira-t-on dans le monde ? Si elle vient nous demander du pain, la refuserons-nous ? (Diderot, La Religieuse)

    Dans les citations suivantes, « must » a indubitablement un sens passé :

    In like manner the effect of every action is measured by the depth of the sentiment from which it proceeds. The great man knew not that he was great. It took a century or two for that fact to appear. What he did, he did because he must. (Ralph Ado Emerson, Spiritual Laws)

    His stories were what frightened people worst of all […]. By his own account he must have lived his life among some of the wickedest men that God ever allowed upon the sea. (TI.1)

    Something must speedily be resolved upon, and it occurred to us at last to go forth together and seek help in the neighbouring hamlet. (TI.4)

    It was only in the exact bottom of the dell and round the tavern door that a thin veil still hung unbroken to conceal the first steps of our escape. Far less than half-way to the hamlet, very little beyond the bottom of the hill, we must come forth into the moonlight. Nor was this all, for the sound of several footsteps running came already to our ears. (TI.4)

    None spoke even to another and they shouldered their horses through the party in a sort of ritual movement as if certain points of ground must be trod in a certain sequence as in a child's game yet with some terrible forfeit at hand. (BM.16)

    By and by the judge rose and moved away on some obscure mission and after a while someone asked the expriest if it were true that at one time there had been two moons in the sky and the expriest eyed the false moon above them and said that it may well have been so. But certainly the wise high God in his dismay at the proliferation of lunacy on this earth must have wetted a thumb and leaned down out of the abyss and pinched it hissing into extinction. And could he find some alter means by which the birds could mend their paths in the darkness he might have done with this one too. (BM.17)


    He carried the two rifles that had belonged to Brown and he wore a pair of canteens crossed upon his chest and he carried a powderhorn and flask and his portmanteau and a canvas rucksack that must have belonged to Brown also. (BM.21)



    Etc., etc.


    Maintenant, il s’agit de savoir si « must » a aussi un sens passé dans les citations suivantes, ou s’il a le sens présent de « doit ». Dans ce dernier cas, la deuxième interprétation prévaudrait :

    Sharp as must have been his annoyance, Silver had the strength of mind to hide it. (TI.12)

    He was concealed by this time behind another tree trunk; but he must have been watching me closely, for as soon as I began to move in his direction he reappeared and took a step to meet me. (TI.15)

    There was a big cake and two little ones on Miss Maudie’s kitchen table. There should have been three little ones. It was not like Miss Maudie to forget Dill, and we must have shown it. But we understood when she cut from the big cake and gave the slice to Jem. (KMB.22)

    Somewhere across the field I could hear the sound of a tractor. A white sharecropper must have been plowing the ground, since no colored people were working today. (LBD.32).

    Glanton wandered through the tall and dusty rooms with their withy ceilings and at length he found an old criada cowering in what must have passed for a kitchen although it contained nothing culinary save a brazier and a few clay pots. (BM.14)

    The musketball went racketing off among the branches. He rolled over and cocked the pistol. The barrel must have been full of snow because when he fired a hoop of orange light sprang out about it and the shot made a strange sound. (BM.15)

    The judge swung his hand and the coin winked overhead in the firelight. It must have been fastened to some subtle lead, horsehair perhaps, for it circled the fire and returned to the judge and he caught it in his hand and smiled. (BM.17)

    Etc., etc.

    En ce qui concerne, le passage où Grant Wiggins franchit les ornières dans la propriété d’Henri Pichot, le voici plus complet, pour que vous puissiez juger en pleine connaissance de cause :

    I stopped at the side gate to Henri Pichot’s large white and gray antebellum house. […] Since the side entrance led from the quarter to the house, Henri Pichot never used this gate. Only tractors, wagons, and trucks used this entrance, and over the many years, they had cut just as many ruts across the yard. I must have hit every one of them, driving up to the house. My aunt never said a thing, but I could feel her eyes on the back of my neck. I was not aiming for the ruts, but I wasn’t avoiding them either. I could hear them bouncing on the back seat, but they never said a word. After parking under one of the great live oaks not far from the back door, I turned around to look at my aunt.

    En ce qui concerne le passage où le tracteur labourait un champ, il continua le labour même après que Grant Wiggins l’eut entendu.

    Post Scriptum : TI, KMB et BM sont des abréviations pour « Treasure Island », « To Kill A Mocking Bird » et “Blood Meridian”.

    Merci de me donner votre avis quant au groupe de citations litigieuses. « must » y est-il au passé ou au présent. Dans ce dernier cas, il y aurait donc un jugement rétrospectif du narrateur.

    Cordialement et respectueusement.

    Bonsoir Espaname

    Je me suis mal exprimé, à propos de la seconde interprétation. Elle serait que le narrateur adopte comme moment "présent" de référence le moment où il situe son récit. C'est ce qui se passe dans la citation de Diderot.
    Cordialement et respectueusement
Connectez-vous ou Inscrivez-vous pour répondre.